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Events

Safiya Noble

Dialogue with the Dean

a series of conversations with emerging and established communicators who are advancing the futures of their fields, challenging paradigms, and promoting social justice

Dialogue with Safiya Noble

Thursday, April 22
6:30-8 p.m (CT) on Zoom

Dr. Safiya Umoja Noble is an Associate Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the Department of Information Studies where she serves as the Co-Director of the UCLA Center for Critical Internet Inquiry. She is the author of a best-selling book on racist and sexist algorithmic bias in commercial search engines, entitled Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism (NYU Press), which has been widely-reviewed in journals and periodicals including the Los Angeles Review of Books, and featured in the New York Public Library 2018 Best Books for Adults (non-fiction).  She is regularly quoted for her expertise on issues of algorithmic discrimination and technology bias by national and international press including The Guardian, the BBC, CNN InternationalUSA TodayWired, Time, Full Frontal with Samantha BeeThe New York Times, and Virginia Public Radio, and a host of local news and podcasts, including Science Friction, and Science Friday to name a few. Safiya holds a Ph.D. and M.S. in library and information science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a B.A. in sociology from Fresno State University.

 

Michael R. Jackson Q&A

 

with Dean E. Patrick Johnson, Associate Professor Miriam Petty and SoC alum Lili-Anne Brown

Thursday, February 25
7 – 8 p.m. (CST) on Zoom webinar

 

Michael R. Jackson‘s 2020 Pulitzer Prize and New York Drama Critics Circle winning A Strange Loop (which had its 2019 world premiere at Playwrights Horizons in association with Page 73 Productions) was called “a full-on laparoscopy of the heart, soul, and loins” and a “gutsy, jubilantly anguished musical with infectious melodies” by Ben Brantley for The New York Times, and “exhilarating and wickedly funny” by Sara Holdren for New York. In The New Yorker, Vinsom Cunningham wrote, “To watch this show is to enter, by some urgent, bawdy magic, an ecstatic and infinitely more colorful version of the famous surreal lithograph by M. C. Escher: the hand that lifts from the page, becoming almost real, then draws another hand, which returns the favor.”

As a songwriter, he has seen his work performed everywhere from Joe’s Pub to NAMT. In addition to A Strange Loop, he also wrote book, music and lyrics for White Girl in Danger; and lyrics and book for the musical adaptation of the 2007 horror film Teeth with composer and co-bookwriter Anna K. Jacobs. Awards and associations include: a New Professional Theatre Festival Award, a Jonathan Larson Grant, a Lincoln Center Emerging Artist Award, an ASCAP Foundation Harold Adamson Award, a Whiting Award, the Helen Merrill Award for Playwriting, a New York Drama Circle Critics Award, an Outer Critics Circle Award, a Drama Desk Award, an Obie Award, an Antonyo Award, a Dramatist Guild Fellowship and he is an alum of Page 73’s Interstate 73 Writers Group. He has commissions from Grove Entertainment & Barbara Whitman Productions and LCT3 and is newly-elected member of the Dramatists Guild Council.

Mr. Jackson’s virtual visit is supported by the Hope Abelson Artist-in-Residence program, which was established at the School of Communication in 1990 through a generous gift from Hope Altman Abelson.

This event is presented in partnership with the Department of Theatre and the Black Arts Consortium.

Ruha Benjamin

Dialogue with the Dean

a series of conversations with emerging and established communicators who are advancing the futures of their fields, challenging paradigms, and promoting social justice

Dialogue with Ruha Benjamin

Thursday, February 18
6:30-8 p.m (CT) on Zoom

Ruha Benjamin is a professor of African American Studies at Princeton University and author of People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier and Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code and editor of Captivating Technology. She has studied the social dimensions of science, technology, and medicine for over fifteen years and speaks widely on issues of innovation, equity, health, and justice in the U.S. and globally. Benjamin is the recipient of many awards and honors, including the 2017 President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Princeton as well as the Brooklyn Public Library’s 2020 Nonfiction Prize for Race After Technology.

John L. Jackson

Dean E. Patrick Johnson is pleased to invite you to attend his inaugural

Dialogue with the Dean

a series of conversations with emerging and established communicators who are advancing the futures of their fields, challenging paradigms, and promoting social justice

Dialogue with John L. Jackson

Wednesday, October 14
6:30-8 pm (CT) on Zoom

John L. Jackson, Jr., is the Walter H. Annenberg Dean of the Annenberg School for Communication and Richard Perry University Professor at the University of Pennsylvania. He was previously Dean of the School of Social Policy & Practice and Special Adviser to the Provost on Diversity at Penn. Jackson earned his B.A. in Communication (Radio/TV/Film) from Howard University, completed his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University, and served as a junior fellow at the Harvard University Society of Fellows before becoming Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University.

Making Sweet Tea: A Discussion

Thursday, October 1, 2020 

Read more about the event.